Religious Education for Youth & Teens

 

Quaker Resources on Religious Education

Youth and Teens

Many of the print resources below are available from the FGC Quaker bookstore, quakerbooks.org.

Youth Resources page—Another page on our website with books, curricula, links to youth-related Quaker organizations, and more.

 

First Day School Curricula

Teacher Aids

Friends General Conference resources

Faith & Play™: fgcquaker.org/faithandplay/

A joint project of FGC and PhYM, Faith & Play™ is a Montessori-inspired resource that helps children find words and images for expressing their experiences of holy mystery and wonder in their lives.

Godly Play® is an experiential and open-ended approach to teaching the Bible to children.

Both programs involve fairly intensive training and some costs.

 

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting resources

Curricula: pym.org/religious-education/curricula
You can sort these resources alphabetically, or by age (as below), or by topic:

  • 5 guides for adults working with kids
  • 4 early elementary
  • 7 elementary
  • 8 elementary thru middle school
  • 2 middle school
  • 5 middle & high school
  • . . . and more

First Day School Threadletter Archive—Threadletters are PhYM digital newsletters published occasionally around an area of meeting life.
pym.org/online-newsletters/threadletter-archives/first-day-school/

Books—QuakerBooks.org

For First Day School resources, click on Children & Young Adults (left sidebar), then First Day School for Young People. QuakerBooks has resources organized in five sections:

Suggested Children's Literature

Simplicity
Roxaboxen
Simple Gifts
Thee Hannah!
Augustus and His Smile
Too Many Toys!

Integrity
The Adventures of Obadiah
The Okay Book
Lives that Speak, by FGC RE Committee
Stargirl (middle school)
The William Penn Book
The Big Orange Splot
Old Turtle and the Broken Tooth

Equality
Rachel and Obadiah
The Other Side
Virgie Goes to School With Us Boys
Moses
Martin's Big Words

Peace
The Knight and the Dragon
The War
Abiyoyo
The Peace Book
When Sophie Gets Angry ...

Community
Swimmy
Nora's Ark
Yard Sale!
If the World Were a Village
Stone Soup (by Muth)
Frederick

Stewardship
Thy Friend Obadiah
Miss Rumphius
The Lorax
Old Turtle
The Gardener


Suggested Ways to Explore Friends Testimonies in a Meeting Community:
These ideas are for older elementary and middle school-age youth, but could also be done with younger kids.  Again, just a start to the ways we might explore how we let our lives speak.

Peace

  • create experiences with conflict resolution programming to experience peace
  • explore "what does peace look like?" -- images, songs, being together, being in nature
  • compare historical peacemaking events with present day, local, and personal peacemaking efforts
  • visit with and help create a program with your Meeting's Peace & Justice or Peace & Social Concerns committee

Equality

  • hold regular youth meetings for business around a concern or leading they carry, and be sure you can facilitate any decisions they make coming to fruition
  • expand on understanding of other religions by visiting other places of worship, or gather with young people from other denominations – play games, have fun together, learn more about one another, share experiences of faith and practicing it

Simplicity

  • invite an older Friend to talk about their experiences with this testimony while growing up as a Quaker
  • make paper, plain bonnets and hats and discuss how it feels to wear them, what it meant to Friends to dress simply and use plain speech; explore how plain dress and speech are relevant in today's culture
  • during the holidays, explore concepts of want vs. need, and thankfulness

Integrity

  • stories and discussion about decisions and actions that bring us closer to the Spirit
  • PYM curriculum "Shaking Out the Truth" covers how to hold threshing sessions, meeting for business and clearness committees

Community/Service/Stewardship

  • engage in service work together, build ongoing relationships within larger community; reflect on service work through discussion and journaling
  • do service work for the meeting community (host a coffee hour, plant spring bulbs)
  • give kids voice and input in choosing service projects that develop their passions
  • work with your Meeting's committees which attend to the community, the property, outreach and service projects